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No-till Gardening free e-course video #1

The no-till method for growing the best celery (5:20)

Farmer Dan demonstrates how to grow the best organic celery the no-till way.

This video covers:
– Full or partial harvest techniques, the latter for seed saving
– When and how often to water
– Why you should add compost as they grow
– How to feed the soil microbiome
– Why you want tall, pale green stems
– The reasons why you might be getting dark green & stringy stems
– The best months for planting
– When you can do your last planting (zones 7 & 8) and what you can do to help your celery survive the winter.

The open pollinating variety that Dan refers to is Tango, available from West Coast Seeds @
https://www.westcoastseeds.com/products/tango-organic

The next installment of the free no-till gardening e-course will reach your inbox in four days time.

Important: if you’ve just registered for the free 7 part e-course, check your inbox for an email with the subject line “Confirm your subscription.”

You will need to click the “Confirm my email” button therein to receive the rest of the videos in the series (note: check your junk folder if you don’t see it in your inbox.) You can unsubscribe at any time.

The Local Harvest Mission & Vision

Local Harvest Vision

Andrew Couzens is a software engineer turned soil scientist.

A life long sufferer with inflammatory bowel disease, he was motivated to enter the agricultural space in an effort to “be the change” he believed was necessary to heal his own body.

Healthy plants come from healthy soil, and healthy soil comes from working with nature, not against it.

Leveraging his knowledge and experience in software engineering, he started Terra Flora Organics with a goal of helping conventional growers move from unsustainable practices that destroy soil and negatively affect the health of people and the planet, to regenerative practices that allow intensive farming whilst building soil and healing our minds and our bodies.

Andrew Couzens